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An international team of researchers plans an experiment on Mount Rtanj

TAG: pyramids, Rtanj, pyramid Rtanj, electromagnetic waves, ultrasound, infrasounds, voice pyramid, SBRG, SB Research Group, Spirit Rtanj, Center Cosmological Studies Nikola Tesla, Demiurg

The main experiment, organized by "The Spirit of Rtanj" association, will begin on August 5th and continue for a some days. This event will be leaded by physics researcher Slobodan Mizdrak. All necessary tools and equipment will be placed on top of the mountain after four hours of walking to reach the summit. The equipment will be left in place on the summit, and connected to the base camp by radio remote control during the experiment, the base camp will be located in a hotel in the nearby valley.

 


Fig. 1 - Mount Rtanj seen from the near valley

 

Our working group (SBRG) will check for the presence of abnormal acoustic vibrations in the area around what locals know to be a "sacred" mountain. This archaeological district, has the remains of ancient Roman structures, but also the existence of prehistoric megaliths and there are many legends and myths that enrich the history of this mountain region.

 


Fig. 2 - We started the acoustic measurements

 

The purpose of our research here is to search for ultrasound, infrasound and low frequencies which may affect or alter the perception of the human organism. For ultrasonic detection, our research group is equipped with a very sophisticated compounderand integrated analyzer of ultrasonic frequencies (Pettersson Ultrasounds Detector D 1000X) as used by our sound engineer, Heikki Savolainen.

 


Fig. 3 - The ultrasonic analyzer Petterssonn

 

We started to analyise those places which were "sacred" according to local mythology and found the presence of an ultrasonic frequency of around 28.300Hz, this was in a prehistoric site on the east side of the plateau next to the mountain with the shape of a triangular base pyramid. in addition to detecting low frequencies in the same place in a range between 20 and 110Hz, the recordings carried out with digital equipment and high-sensitivity microphones confirmed this data.

The summit of the mountain group (Siljak) had in previous years demonstrated the presence of electromagnetic phenomena (VLF radio waves) at a frequency of 28.3 KHz.

 

 

 Fig. 4 - Our sound engineer Heikki Savolainen working together with other researchers in a Serbian sacred site

 

Fig. 5 - The same site as seen from the PIP camera (Polycontrast Interference Photography) three years ago, courtesy of prof. Ljubo Ristovski, a nuclear physicist, who had previously done this analysis. It is clear from the colors of the sky on the right the presence of energy coming out from the ground (electromagnetic waves)

 

Every night after dinner and following a day of intense work, the researchers made various presentations illustrating the status of their research to the large audience present at the meeting. The analytical work in this area will continue for the entire next week until Saturday August 10th.

Paolo Debertolis for the SBRG group - August 3, 2013

 

Translated by Nina Earl


 

The laboratory researches on systems for acoustic resonance in the ancient sites and related brain activity are going on at the University of Trieste

TAG: archaeoacoustics, underground structure, ancient temple, hypogeum, Cividale del Friuli, resonance, EEG, brain activity, SBRG, SB Research Group

We are continuing to research the archeoacoustic effects of resonance frequencies found in several ancient Neolithic sites on the human body, or rather how they affect brain activity.

We have begun the first phase of verification. In fact the equipment testing phase has now finished and we have begun an evaluation phase on volunteers, they are wired up to EEG whilst listening to audio frequencies between 90Hz and 120Hz. These frequencies are commonly found in the temples examined by Robert Jahn in the 1990s in Southern England and Ireland, but are also present in Neolithic underground structures as Hal Saflieni in Malta and the hypogeum of Cividale del Friuli in Italy.

 


Fig. 1 - The control desk placed close to the absorbing sound room

 

Like in the study by Ian Cook et al.  at the University of California, all of our volunteers were subjected to a "comfortable" volume in the absorbing sound room of the Otorhinolaryngology Clinic of the University of Trieste. This type of room is also protected by a fitted Faraday cage inside the walls to sheild from any possible external electromagnetic interferences that could affect the results.

 

 

Fig. 2 - A large number of electrodes was on the head of the volunteers

 

At the beginning of the test volunteers choose the volume of sound (from high-fidelity speakers) which was comfortable for them. The same subject remained in silence with closed eyes while the device recorded electroencephalographic their resting brain rhythm. The EEG equipment and technical cooperation necessary for the conduct of the examination was provided by the Department of Clinical Neurophysiology of the Neurological Clinic ot the University of Trieste.

 

Fig. 3 - The operators at work at the control desk during the experiment

 

After two minutes of silence to evaluate the resting brain rhythm, the volunteers were subjected to the tones of 90, 95, 100, 105, 110, 115, 120Hz arranged in a random way for one minute each. At the end of every cycle they listened to a mantra of the same frequency for a period of two minutes. This test was slightly different from the experiment of Cook, who used only 5 frequencies from 90 to 130Hz with 10Hz between without other types of sounds. The 130Hz was not used in our study because it was not found in any of the Neolithic temples we examined.

Of course, during the examination the door was closed and the volunteer remained alone in the room.

 

Fig. 4 - The computer tone generator (visible in the foreground) provided the necessary frequencies for the experiment

 

All the volunteers said the sound experience was "amazing." Even two operators from the research team wanted to take the test to subjectively evaluate the correctness of the procedure.

 


 Fig. 5 - Even two operators of the research team wanted to take the test

 

Much of the preparation time was used to place electrodes on a specific cap on the head of the volunteer under examination, this maneuver was carried out outside the acoustic room.

 

Fig. 6 - Preparatory work for the positioning of the headset with electrodes

 

Next month expert technicians will examine the EEGs for verifying the collected data. After we will move on to examine the same subjects in the underground structure that we are studying in Cividale del Friuli, subjecting them to the resonance frequencies present in it and theoretically making a comparative assessment.

 


Fig. 7 - The EEGs are no longer on chemical paper, but are digitally recorded and are saved in the form of computer files

 

The research will resume in September of this year.

Paolo Debertolis - July 25, 2013

 

A heartfelt thanks to all those who work for the success of this research project and in particular to the Director of the Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, dr. Fabrizio Monti, and the Director of Clinical Otorhinolaryngology, professor Giancarlo Tirelli, and to all the technical and medical staff. A sincere thanks to the Director of the Department of Medical Sciences, prof. Roberto Di Lenarda, for the support in our research.

Here is an example of tone used during the experiment at 110Hz, in this case with the duration of two minutes.

 

References

R.G. Jahn, et al.: "Acoustical Resonances of Assorted Ancient Structures" Technical Report no.95002 PEAR, Princeton University, March 1995

R.G. Jahn, P. Devereux, M. Ibison: "Acoustical Resonances of Assorted Ancient Structures" J. Acoust. Am Soc Vol.99 No.2, February 1996, pp.649-658

Cook, I. A.; Pajot, S. K.; Leuchter, A. F., Ancient Architectural Acoustic Resonance Patterns and Regional Brain Activity, Time and Mind, Volume 1, Number 1, March 2008 , pp. 95-104(10)

 


 

Systems of acoustic resonance in the ancient sites and related brain activity - Preliminary study

TAG: archaeoacoustics, hypogeum, Cividale del Friuli, resonance, EEG, brain activity, SBRG, SB Research Group

 

We are beginning a new study  in collaboration with the Otorhinolaryngology Clinic and the Neurophysiology Service of Trieste for the assessment of the effects of resonance phenomena on the human body. Such effects are found in several ancient sites, in particular in the Hypogeum of Cividale del Friuli and in Hal Saflieni in Malta.

We will work with volunteers who will undergo examination by EEG while listening to tones between 90Hz and 120Hz, similar to the resonant sounds present in some Neolithic structures in Europe (England, Ireland, Italy, Malta). The international standards for testing on human volunteers protocol will be adhered to.

The study will seek to deepen what has already been found at the University of California (UCLA) in its laboratories (Laboratory of Brain, Behavior, and Pharmacology) by Professors I. A. Cook, S. K. Pajot and A. F. Leuchter. We will also extend the research directly to the archaeological site of Cividale del Friuli.

For this purpose we will use as our laboratory the absorbing room in the
Otorhinolaryngology Clinic for audiometric tests, this has been suitably modified with suitable software and hardware.

 

 

 

Fig. 1 – The absorbing sound room which will be our laboratory

 

Fig. 2 – Researchers of the Otorhinolaryngology Clinic at work

 

 

Fig. 3 – An example of the study of a tone at 125 Hz The room does not appear disturbed by spurious frequencies coming from the outside, but there is only the peak of the sound emitted by the equipment

 

The absorbing soundroom has been examined to ensure ultrasonic or infrasonic frequencies are not being emitted from the rooms ventilation system, which could affect the results.

The research is estimated to take approximately six months.

SBRG - July 11, 2013

 

 Translated by Nina Earl


 

Preliminary results of our research in archaeoacoustics in Cividale del Friuli hypogeum, Italy

 

TAG: archaeoacoustics, hypogeum, Cividale, resonance, ultrasounds, infrasounds, SBRG, SB Research Group, Paolo Debertolis, Valter Maestra

After careful analysis on the recordings made in the last months, some members of SBRG have started a new season of acoustic analysis of the Cividale del Friuli hypogeum.

This consists of various underground spaces below the surface, carved out of the conglomerate with different levels and branches. Its shape looks very rough to a careless eye, but in reality despite the alterations over the centuries, the builders made full use of the shape of the rooms to take advantage of the resonance phenomenon, obtained during prayers mystic songs.

 

Fig. 1 - Map of the hypogeum of Cividale del Friuli

 

The underground could have been derived from a natural cavity along  the right rocky riverbank of the Natisone river. Aside from the fanciful interpretations mixed with legends, it was hypothesized that during the Celtic age, the Hypogeum was used as a depository for funerary urns, however other researchers believed it was used as a prison during the Roman or Lombard period.

On the other hand, there are three big and disturbing masks carved on its walls in the style of the Celtic tradition, similar to the remains of sculptures found in Celtic graves in France known as têtes coupées. So the niches carved out by other hands along the route are perfectly dry, possibly used at a later date as a mortuary. In respect of the other chambers they are wet so would have been unsuitable for use as a mortuary.


It is assumed that even some of the hypogeum rooms functioned as tanks with water and rites of uncertain origin. However, the true function and origin of this underground structure, which is unique in Friuli, remains a historic mystery. We can be certain that the underground had been remodeled in successive periods, however all the other hypotheses have not been supported by evidence.

The structure is represented by a central higher chamber, which is reached from the surface through a steep ladder that descends in depth. At the beginning of this ladder, you can find the only window that gives you the access to the riverbank of the  Natisone, the rest of the structure is totally underground. Three corridors depart from the central chamber, with niches and seats of various heights. Many niches appear to have been dug with a pick and refer to later periods.

 


Fig. 2 - The stairs leading to the central room (chamber A of the map)

 

The focus of our research group on this archaeological site was drawn from the theories about the function of this place by Valter Maestra, an independent researcher and historian of ancient civilizations. He drew a parallel with similar existing caves found in Peru, which were used to officiate rites of prayer to Mother Earth. According to this hypothesis, the hypogeum would have the same function as the caves found in Peru, with the aim of contacting the esoteric underworld.

The assumption seemed to us undoubtedly striking and, in parallel with research in archaeo-acoustics recently conducted in the South of England from SBRG. We are aware the resonance phenomenon has been detected in the Maltese underground temples by other researchers, so we wanted to test in the same way this structure.

 


Fig. 3 - Chamber B of Cividale del Friuli hypogeum has a different shape than C and D chambers. Therefore it is likely it was adjusted in subsequent periods or had another purpose

 

A few months after the beginning of the research, we have been able to detect the presence of the resonance effect in two chambers C and D (see map), these maintain the original form retaining an arched shape along the top. There is also a small truss on the end wall which seems to have been specially built to tune up the room for a male voice singing or praying.

 


Fig. 4 - The entrance to chamber C which seems to have retained the original shape and has demonstrated the presence of a conspicuous effect of resonance

 

Fig. 5 - The logarithmic plot of the effect of resonance in C chamber. The hump between 30KHz and 90KHz is due to increased sensitivity of the Sennheiser microphones at these frequencies, but there is not anomaly in this. No ultrasounds have been found in the Cividale hypogeum so far

 

The male voice is absolutely necessary to stimulate the resonance phenomenon as the two chambers are tuned to 94 and 102Hz. On several occasions we used a female voice, including a female mezzo-soprano voice however the resonance effect was not reached because below 150Hz it is wholly insufficient to stimulate the structure.

 


Fig. 6 - The recording devices placed at the entrance of the room C

 

Fig. 7 - The unilluminated bottom of  D chamber with highlighted in red microphones positioned for recording

 

Fig. 8 - Our collaborator, Dolores Dreosti, who sung using her mezzo-soprano voice for sound analysis of D chamber

 

The recordings were made with the usual archaeo-acoustics technical protocol of SBRG. Digital Recorder Tascam DR-680 programmed for a 192kHz sampling rate and Sennheiser MKH 3020 microphones, equipped with shielded cables Mogami Gold Edition XLR and gold-plated connectors.

 

 Fig. 9 - The extremely flat response of Sennheiser MKH 3020 microphones with a greater sensitivity in the field of ultrasounds

 

The experiment took place on various days over the last months and different singers were used to search for the right frequencies for the resonance phenomena. The tracks were examined with two programs for sound analysis: Praat program version 4.2.1 from the University of Toronto and Audacity open-source program version 2.0.2, both for Windows PC.

 


Fig. 10 - Top: the harmonious appearance of the graph from chamber D, with a male voice stimulating the resonance at 102Hz. Bottom: the detectable graph of D chamber when the voice is female. The dominant feature is around 198Hz, the hole in the low frequency range between 20Hz up to 200Hz is clearly shown in the graph

 

The resonance sound response is a range of sound that starts from infrasonic up to the frequency of 102Hz for D chamber or 94Hz for C chamber (the tuning by a male voice to create the resonant effect). This is particularly evident when comparing this graph with the graph of the female voice in which a hole appears in the same range of audible frequencies.

 


Fig. 11 - Chamber E located below the access ladder, had no resonant effect. It is possible this was dug in a later period as its shape is completely different from the other rooms

 


Fig. 12 - The researchers who participated in the experiment of May 14, 2013

 

We will publish as soon as possible the final results in an international scientific journal.

Paolo DebertolisMay 19, 2013

 

This is an original studio file collected in the hypogeum on 13th of May, 2013. It is recommended to listen ONLY through high-fidelity stereo headphones with a wide range of low frequencies, otherwise you can not hear just a little the resonance phenomenon. The file is not altered, but only compressed into .mp3 format because the original file in .wav format with 192kHz sampling rate has more than 200 Megabytes. This file takes about 2 minutes to listen in silence. To download the file (for personal use only and not for distribution) please click here.


A sincere thank you from the SBRG research group to the owners of Cividale del Friuli hypogeum for their helpfulness and kindness in yielding even at night their ancient  monument for our experiments. Heartfelt thanks also to Mr. Federico, who patiently gave us the keys of the hypogeum to our researches at all hours of the day.

 

Translated by Nina Earl

 


 

Last mission of archaeoacoustics for SBRG to Visoko in Bosnia-Herzegovina


TAG: pyramids Bosnia, Bosnian Pyramids, archaeoacoustics, Visoko civilization, pyramids, infrasound, low frequency, ultrasound, voice pyramid, SBRG, SB Research Group, Paolo Debertolis

At the end of April 2013 a new mission to Visoko (Bosnia-Herzegovina), restricted to a few members, concluded the research of SB Research Group about archeoacoustics on the Bosnian Pyramid of the Sun, otherwise known as Visoćica Hill.

 

 Fig. 1 – The Bosnian Pyramid of the Sun (Visoćica Hill) as seen from the roofs of Visoko

 

In this cooling-off period on all data collected in nearly three years of research in the territory of the Bosnian Federation and reviewing the recordings made previously on top of the Pyramid of the Sun by various digital equipment, we found some unexpected anomalies within low audio frequencies and infrasounds.

For this reason we needed a new mission to settle the doubts on the validity of previously collected data. Therefore we repositioned the microphones for the transmission of sound in air at different positions of the top of the Pyramid of the Sun and other nearby hills.

 


 

Fig. 2 – The settlings of the equipment inside the ruins of the medieval citadel

 

Regarding the protocol used in this case, our equipment of choice was composed of an ultrasensitive condenser microphones with phantom power at 48 volts (consists in passing the power supply along the same audio cables in which the signal passes) set in the air (Sennheiser MKH 3020, frequency response 10-70,000Hz) and a professional digital recorder Tascam DR-680 with recording schedule by 192KHz sampling rate (frequency audio response from 10 to 96,000Hz). For connections we used a high quality shielded cables (Mogami Gold Edition) with gold-plated XLR connectors.

 

Fig. 3 – The gold-plated XLR connectors of excellent shielded cables Mogami Gold Edition

 

In particular we focused the research on the low emission frequencies and infrasounds that may be present in that location. The microphones (directional) were placed towards the ground a few inches off the ground supported by absorbing noise trestles.

The sites of the logging operations were within the ruins of the medieval town of Visoki, located in the west section of the flat summit of the pyramid, and in the little dry basin on the opposite side of the plateau on the east side. These two areas were chosen because any noise disturbance from the enviroment was minimised.

 

Fig. 4 – The microphones highlighted in red in one of the potions where they were placed inside the medieval walls

 

 

Between one recording and the other we left long pauses to check for any differences in the different hours of the day. The recordings needed a lot of hours until late in the whole number of days taken both on the Pyramid of the Sun and nearby areas.

The results were very impressive. The whole top of the Pyramid of the Sun seems to emit low frequencies and infrasounds which have a large volume peak, with an apex around 48Hz. The range of these very low frequencies is between 10 and 70Hz. It has not been possible to assess the amount of infrasounds present below 10Hz because this is the limit of the instruments, but this is not relevant to this research because these vibrations are ubiquitous on Earth and purely tectonic.

 


 Fig. 5The graph of the recording on top of the Pyramid of the Sun has always more or less the same trend at different moments in the day. In total silence there is always a spike in volume between 10 and 70 Hz, with a peak at 48 Hz

 

Comparing the graph obtained with the same type of measurements observed on a nearby hill you can clearly observe a sharp drop in the volume of the sound with the rise of the frequencies of the latter, a situation that does not happen on the Pyramid of the Sun, in whose graph there is a prominent broad peak corresponding to these very low frequencies and infrasounds.

 


Fig. 6This is what we found on a nearby hill: the apparent volume drops by the progress of frequencies

 

 

Fig. 7 – The Sennheiser MKH 3020 microphones were also used to check on the nearby hills

 

Fig. 8 – The digital recorder Tascam DR-680 has shown also in this case a great versatility, the only problem is the very high consumption of batteries for power - "phantom" of 48V to two condenser microphones Sennheiser MKH 3020

 

The low volume of low audio frequencies emissions for a relatively short period on top of the pyramid appears not to have any consequences for the human body, at least according to international literature.

But it appears to be clear that those people who are particularly sensitive who go on top of the pyramid, feel an experience of "energy" coming into their body. They are actually perceiving distinctly low-frequency mechanical vibrations interpreting them as “energy”.

Sounds at very low frequency and infrasound vibrations are perceived, in fact more by nerve receptors in the bones than by the cells of the spiral organ of hearing. Furthermore this type of sound vibration is not directional, it appears to have a substantial effect on cognitive abilities of the human organism, as reported in the literature (Gavreau,
Science Journal: Vol 4, No.1 - Jan 1968).

Unfortunately infrasounds have been long studied primarily as a weapon of the future, as they are able to confound and reduce the capacity of resistance and concentration of the enemy, if output at a high volume.

But this effect only applies to high volumes, with lower volumes this does not happen, indeed such vibrations can instead strengthen the human perceptual abilities (Tandy and Lawrence,
Journal of the Society for Psychical Research, April 1998, 62). This could explain the mystical feeling that some people feel when they go to the top of the Pyramid of the Sun or if they are in deep meditation, but of course this happens also in other "sacred" places from time immemorial and with the same natural tonal characteristics.



Fig. 9 – The top of the Pyramid of the Sun as seen from the side of the east plateau, April 2013. On the right side of the mountain are the ruins of the medieval citadel

 

However, it is not possible to correlate the presence of ultrasounds found on top of the pyramid to altered states of consciousness. The ultrasounds, as we had previously detected on the top of the pyramid, are inconsistent  appearing to relate to the seasonal changes in the weather. As we noted earlier, ultrasounds are present in a single place on top of the Pyramid of the Sun and being a very directional vibration may have been heard or rather felt by a young and careful ear in the past, especially if they were resting on the ground (Takeda et al., European Journal of Applied Physiology, 1992,  65), so as to hear the voice of a “God” enclosed inside the pyramid. But in this last case ultrasounds have no possibilities to give other tangible effects on the human psyche.

Paolo DebertolisMay 9, 2013

 

This is an original file collected on top of the Pyramid of the Sun on this occasion. It is recommended to listen ONLY through high-fidelity stereo headphones with a wide range of low frequencies, otherwise you can not hear anything. The file is not altered, but only compressed into .mp3 format because the original file in .wav format with 192kHz sampling rate has more than 300 Megabytes. This file takes about 2 minutes to listen in silence. In addition to the various ambient noises you can distinctly hear, there are very low vibrations pulsating. You can compare with the sound from an airplane passing over us at the minute 1:26 and for which we interrupt the recording (also for dogs barking!).

To download the file (for personal use only and not for distribution) please click
here.

 

Translated by Nina Earl

 

 


 

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