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Archaeoacoustic analysis of Cybele’s temple, Imperial Roman Palace of Felix Romuliana, Serbia

An interpretation using a method complementary to archaeology

 

Paolo Debertolis*, Maja Zivić**

 

 *Department of Medical Sciences - University of Trieste, Italy

**National Museum Zaječar, Curator of Roman Palace Felix Romuliana, Gamzigrad, Serbia

 

Abstract - Archaeoacoustic and physical phenomena research at ancient sites has developed beyond the initial stage. Our research group uses a practical standard (SBSA) complementing the field of archaeology. Studying archaeoacoustics and natural phenomena over the last four years, has enables us to offer an explanation as to some of the enigmas of ancient archaeological sites that were not possible to explain with other methods. Following our experience, we applied the same method to look at an interesting question about the orientation of Cybele’s Temple situated within the Imperial Roman Palace Felix Romuliana, South-East Serbia. This temple and its fixtures are the only place within the palace that is not oriented along the east-west axis of the complex as was the Roman tradition (Decumanus). Historians also made reference to mysterious rituals, so we used archaeoacoustical methods to better understand why this ought be. We found that the temple’s orientation followed the direction of some infrasound and low frequency vibrations most likely originating from an underground flow of water. These frequencies would have increased the effect of rituals by enhancing the psyche of the participants due to the influence of these low vibrations on human brain waves. This suggests the builders of this temple had some sort of knowledge of this effect.

Keywords: archaeoacoustics, infrasounds, low frequencies, brain activity, SBRG

 

This scientific paper was published on the issue of December 2015 (Volume 3, Number 2, pp.1-19)of the Journal of Anthropology and Archaeology (USA), ISSN 2334-2420 (Print Version) 2334-2439 (Online Version),  DOI: 10.15640/jaa.v3n2a1, URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.15640/jaa.v3n2a1.

You can find the original paper in English here.

 

 


 

 

Archaeoacoustic analysis of the ancient town of Alatri in Italy

aPaolo Debertolis, bDaniele Gullà

aDepartment of Medical Sciences, Chair of Dental Archaeology, Project SB Research Group, University of Trieste, Italy

 bProject SB Research Group, Bologna, Italy

Summary – SBRG’s research of archaeoacoustic and physical phenomena at ancient sites has developed over a number of years. Our research group uses a practical standard (SBSA) which complements the field of archaeology. Studying archaeoacoustics and natural phenomena over the last five years, it has enabled us to offer an explanation of some of the enigmas of ancient archaeological sites that were not previously possible to explain using other methods. Following our experience, we utilised the same archaeoacoustic methodology to study the town of Alatri in Italy. The present Cathedral of Alatri stands at the highest point of the town underneath which lays a Cyclopean temple. We sought to understand why such a temple was built on top of the hill. Using our SBRG protocol we discovered very strong and significant low vibrations (seismic waves) continuously emitted from the subsoil. Our hypothesis suggests the exposure to such vibrations in the absence of noise could have a significant effect on the psyche of those who came for prayer and meditation, facilitating access into a mystical state. Even though ancient people did not own the same equipment we have today, they would have been aware of the conditions required to achieve such a mystical state, perhaps by simply sensing they were closer to God in a given location. The seismic waves would appear to arise from the geological fault located on the side of the hill where the town has stood since ancient times. The presence of these seismic frequencies would have increased the effect of rituals by enhancing the psyche of the participants due to the influence of these low vibrations on human brain waves. This suggests the builders of this temple had some sort of knowledge of this effect and offers a possible explanation as to why the temple was built in that particular location.

Keywords: archaeoacoustics, Alatri, polygonal walls, low frequency sound, infrasound, SBRG, SB Research Group

This scientific paper was published on the  issue of September 2015 (Volume 2, Number 3, pp. 1-29) of the British Journal of Interdisciplinary Science, ISSN 2056-5402 (Online), UK, (scientific journal dead in 2016).

You can find the original paper in English here


 

Anthropological analysis of human body emissions using new photographic technologies

Paolo Debertolis*, Daniele Gullà**

 

*Department of Medical Sciences - University of Trieste, Italy

**SB Research Group, Bologna, Italy

 

Abstract - SB Research Group experience in the field of archaeoacoustics has developed over the last few years which includes new research methods that examine the effect sacred sites have on the human brain. One such method builds on experience gained in the forensic field. using extreme UV photography via a prototype camera. New discoveries in neurophysiology have enabled emotional states of a given subject to be measured by recording UV light emitted from the brain. A halo effect was recorded around the head which looked similar to the aureole of saints or glorified people represented in historical  paintings.  This aureole was found to be larger and stronger in people who were trained to meditation and prayer. This phenomenon is stronger in ancient “sacred” sites too.

Keywords:  extreme ultraviolet light, halo, anthropology, body emission

 

Proceedings in Scientific Conference “The 3rd International Virtual Conference on Advanced Scientific Results (SCIECONF-2015)", Slovakia, Žilina, May 25-29, 2015; Volume 3, Issue 1: 162-168.

Published by: EDIS - Publishing Institution of the University of Zilina, Univerzitná 1, 01026 Žilina, Slovak Republic.

ISBN: 978-80-554-0891-0 ISSN: 1339-9071 CDROM ISSN: 1339-3561.

You can find the original paper in English here. You can find the original paper from the congress web site here.

 

 


 

 

Archaeoacoustic Analysis of the Ħal Saflieni Hypogeum in Malta

Paolo Debertolis*, Fernando Coimbra**, Linda Eneix***

 

 *Department of Medical Sciences - University of Trieste, Italy

**Quaternary and Prehistoric Group, Centre for Geosciences, University of Coimbra, Portugal

***Mediterranean Institute of Ancient Civilizations, The OTS Foundation,
United States and Malta

 

Abstract - Recently we studied the acoustic properties of the underground Ħal Saflieni Hypogeum in Malta. Identified as “architecture in the negative”, it is a unique prehistoric complex, intentionally sculpted with features that mirror megalithic temples above ground. It is known that the Hypogeum was used in the Neolithic not only as a depository for bones, but also as a shrine for ritual use. In a room known as the “Oracle Room” set in the second level of the hypogeum, we have been able to detect the presence of a strong resonance effect: a double resonance frequency at 70Hz and 114Hz. With a male voice tuned to these frequencies it is possible to stimulate the resonance phenomenon throughout the hypogeum. It was further detected that percussion instruments can stimulate the resonance by their harmonics. Laboratory testing indicates that these frequencies have a strong effect on human brain activity. Since it is likely that the chambers served as centers for social or spiritual events, the resonance of the chamber cavities would have supported human ritual chanting and mystic consciousness.

Keywords: Archaeoacoustics, Ħal Saflieni, hypogeum, resonance, brain activity, megalithic architecture

 

This scientific paper was published on the  issue of June 2015 (Volume 3, Number 1, pp. 59-79) of the Journal of Anthropology and Archaeology (USA), ISSN 2334-2420 (Print Version) 2334-2439 (Online Version), DOI: 10.15640/jaa.v3n1a4.

You can find the original paper in English here.




.

Archaeoacoustic analysis of the ancient site of Kanda (Macedonia). Preliminary results.

Paolo Debertolis*, Aristotel Tentov**, Domagoj Nikolić***, Goran Marjanović****, Heikki Savolainen*****, Nina Earl****

 

 *Department of Medical Sciences - University of Trieste, Italy

**Department of IT, University "St. Kiril i Metodij" Skopje, Macedonia

***Rochester Institute of Technology, Dubrovnik, Croatia

****SB Research Group, Europe

*****HSS Production, Audiovisual Impressions, Helsinki, Finland

 

Abstract — Research was carried out on a geoglyph located in Kanda (Macedonia) by an international team using interdisciplinary methods (astronomy, philosophy, mythology, mathematics and physics). The research conducted on two occasions in 2014 was undertaken to establish all potential anomalies in the IS, US and EM spectrum with special attention to anomalies common to sacred sites, but as yet unexplained by standard physics.

We conclude the Geoglyph looks to be built on an artificial hill. This hill or mound also appears to be artificial from the aeroplane. The Geoglyph is visible only from the sky and is located in an oval ditch.

Some measurements suggest that there is chamber located below the surface.  Research by different methods (infra-/ultrasound research, AMT measurements, binary algorithm synthesis from audio waves, data sonification and dowsing) also found that at the sacred enclosure primary water is located at the centre or at some point along its major axis. Furthermore, since the soil does not match the surrounding area, it would certainly appear that this mound has been carefully constructed with a specific purpose in mind. What exactly that purpose is remains to be investigated in future.

Keywords - archaeoacustics, geoglyph, Kanda, Sveti Nikole, Macedonia, brain activity

 

Proceedings in the Congress “The 3rd Virtual International Conference on Advanced Research in Scientific Areas” (ARSA-2014) Slovakia,  December 1 - 5, 2014: 237-251.

(http://www.arsa-conf.com).

Published by: EDIS - Publishing Institution of the University of Zilina, Univerzitná 1, 01026 Žilina, Slovak Republic.

ISBN: 978-80-554-0958-0, ISSN: 1338-9831

You can find the original paper in English by SBRG here.

 

 


 

 


 

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