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Forensic Imaging in Anthropology

Paolo Debertolis*, Nina Earl**

 

*Department of Medical Sciences - University of Trieste

   **SB Research Group, London, UK

Summary - Obtaining a dedicated infrared or ultraviolet forensic camera can prove to be a great problem for a researcher with limited funds. This paper illustrates how to modify a standard reflex digital camera to function like a forensic camera, using filters and light. This modified camera can be used to carry out detailed analysis of bones excavated on an archaeological dig using infrared and ultraviolet photography. This technique could be extended into other fields of study with little additional cost.

Keywords: anthropology, forensic camera, infrared, forensic imaging

 

Proceedings in Scientific Conference “2nd HASSACC 2014 - Human And Social Sciences at the Common Conference", Slovakia, Žilina, November 17-21, 2014: 206-212.

(http://www.hassacc.com).

Published by: EDIS - Publishing Institution of the University of Zilina, Univerzitná 1, 01026 Žilina, Slovak Republic.

ISBN: 978-80-554-0949-8, ISSN: 1339-522X

You can find the original paper in English here

You can find the original paper from the web site of the conference here.

 

 


 

Archaeoacoustic analysis of an ancient hypogeum using new TRV camera (Variable Resonance Camera) technology

Paolo Debertolis*, Daniele Gullà**, Florentina Richeldi**

 

*Department of Medical Sciences - University of Trieste, Italy

**IPERLAB laboratory, Bologna, Italy

 

Abstract - Combined with research on the effect of acoustics on the human body, archaeoacoustics is an interesting method to reanalyse ancient sites. As well as broadening our understanding of the ancient world, this multidisciplinary approach seeks to recover “ancient knowledge” that affects the emotional sphere of human consciousness. In this study, we have examined the relationship between the resonance effect present in Cividale del Friuli hypogeum and the altered state of consciousness of volunteers using TRV technology. The results showed that after eight minutes of exposure to resonance within one of the hypogeum chambers, both volunteers and the chamber itself become attuned to the same frequency. This represents an unexpected result. On the one hand it would appear the volunteers adapt themselves to the vibrations of the chamber, whilst the environment seemingly adapts itself to the state of mind of the subjects. It is almost as if some sort of bidirectional influence is at play.

Keywords:  archaeoacoustics; hypogeum; Cividale del Friuli; resonance; TRV technology;

 

Proceedings in Scientific Conference “The 2nd International Virtual Conference on Advanced Scientific Results (SCIECONF-2014)", Slovakia, Zilina, June 9-13, 2014 (http://www.scieconf.com).

Published by: EDIS - Publishing Institution of the University of Zilina, Univerzitná 1, 01026 Žilina, Slovak Republic.

You can find the original paper in English here

You can find the original paper from the congress web site here

 

 

 


 

 

Preliminary Report from the Hal Saflieni Hypogeum Acoustic Project

 Paolo Debertolis*, Linda Eneix**

 

*Department of Medical Sciences - University of Trieste

   **The OTS Foundation, Mediterranean Institute of Ancient Civilizations

Summary - Malta's Hal Saflieni Hypogeum site is multi-chambered and acoustically complex. Although legends and myths about its sound behaviour have persisted since its rediscovery in 1902, the February 2014 exercise is the first scientific examination of its resonant properties to produce results. A full report is being prepared for publication.

Under the supervision of Heritage Malta, we placed microphones in the Oracle Chamber of Malta's Hal Saflieni Hypogeum, a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

 

This scientific report was presented at Conference "Archaeoacoustics. The Archaeology of Sound", Malta, February 19-22, 2014

Site of the Conference in Malta.

This short paper was included in the volume of Proceedings of the Conference, available in Internet (ISBN-13: 978-1497591264, ISBN-10: 1497591260), pg. 66.

This is the original paper in English language.

Samples of audio files taken during the experiment.


 

 

 

 


 

Analysis in Gozo

Paolo Debertolis*, Nina Earl**

 

*Department of Medical Sciences - University of Trieste

   **SB Research Group, London, UK

Summary - As part of the research carried out on some of Malta’s Neolithic temples, we performed some testing on the sister island of Gozo with very good results especially in the Xaghra Stone Circle. This energy is a mechanical vibratory stress that appears to have a broad peak, reaching between 25Hz and 34Hz. It is extremely powerful, more or less comparable to what was found in the temples of Tarxien in Malta, but with a slightly longer high frequency range and oscillating just a little bit. Its origin is to be found in the movement of friction between the African and Eurasian tectonic plates close to the archipelago of Malta. The broad peak at Xaghra Stone Circle seems to intrude in the field of infrasound and in the audible band comfortably up to 40Hz. At this frequency, this vibration is clearly perceptible to an attentive ear and for those who are more sensitive, via the vibrator sensors of body.

This short scientific report was presented at Conference "Archaeoacoustics. The Archaeology of Sound", Malta, February 19-22, 2014

Site of the Conference in Malta.

This paper was included in the volume of Proceedings of the Conference, available in Internet (ISBN-13: 978-1497591264, ISBN-10: 1497591260), page 140.

This is the original paper in English language.

 

 

 


 

 

Archaeoacoustical analysis of an ancient hypogeum in Italy

 Paolo Debertolis*, Niccolò Bisconti**

 

*Department of Medical Sciences - University of Trieste

   **Department of Archaeology and Art History - University of  Siena

 

Summary - The archaeoacoustic properties of an ancient hypogeum in Cividale del Friuli (North Italy) were studied. A series of experiments took place over a one year period to establish its acoustical resonant properties. A number of male and female singers were used and a resonance of 94Hz and 103Hz was discovered in two of the hypogeum’s six chambers. The best frequency response was obtained when male singers were positioned inside a ‘sound node’ that was discovered in both chambers. The term "node" refers to the point in the interior space of the chamber where the greatest acoustic resonance effect is achieved.

Later the effects of a frame drum were studied in one of the two chambers. Although it had an average frequency response of 55Hz, the drum was able to activate the chambers resonance of 103Hz from its harmonics. 

The research demonstrated the male voice was more successful in stimulating the resonance than a female voice, as the required resonant frequencies commonly fall within the male vocal range.

This study demonstrates that archaeoacoustics is an interesting emerging field capable of analysing ancient sites, utilizing different study parameters to those usually used in archaeology. Research in this field is re-discovering lost technology that operates on the human emotional sphere.

 

This scientific paper was presented at Conference "Archaeoacoustics. The Archaeology of Sound", Malta, February 19-22, 2014.

Site of the Conference in Malta.

This paper was included in the volume of Proceedings of the Conference, available in Internet (ISBN-13: 978-1497591264, ISBN-10: 1497591260), pg. 131-139.

This is the original paper from proceedings book.

This is the preliminary paper with coloured images.

 


 

 

 


 

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